Thalias Hospitality

KhemaHow Brunch Saved the Weekend!

Brunch has become a traditional time to go out and enjoy a full meal in the late morning or early afternoon with friends and booze. But how did brunch become part of our weekly treat? One of the most interesting parts of brunch is its origin. Although first published in England, the concept of brunch has become part of our cuisine’s history. This meal will forever be embedded in history as the meal that helped the weekends with bacon, eggs, movement in the women’s workforce, and recovering debauchery. Everyone knows that the word “brunch” is a mixture of the words…

MalisThe Festive Hope – Portrait Sothy Keo

Siem Reap lays quiet on the morning of April 18th, the day after Khmer New Year comes to an end. The sun shines brightly on the newly constructed roads that are caked with layers of baby powder — the smokey evidence of the week-long Khmer New Year’s water fights that took hold over the city. Nestled on the riverbanks are two sister restaurants of Khéma and Malis, decorated lightly with multi-coloured stars and straw hats that represent the festive holiday. Sothy Keo runs both restaurants in Siem Reap. Ever since she was promoted to Malis’ manager in 2016 and has…

Malis10 Gift Ideas For Mother’s Day (May 8th)

Although it’s a Western holiday, Mother’s Day is becoming widely celebrated among families in Cambodia on May 8. Remember, there are all types of mothers, so looking for a good gift for Mother’s Day can feel stressful. While there are many popular ideas on what to get her, here are some ideas and places to check out in Phnom Penh. Exquisite Cambodian Cuisine You can’t go wrong with treating your Mum at Malis and charm her by the romantic place, a superb garden oasis with its lush vegetation around the fish pond. Malis is the perfect place for an unforgettable Cambodian feast in the…

TopazThe Secrets of the Tomahawk Steak

If you like bone-in steaks such as T-bone or Porterhouse, you’ll love the “Tomahawk Steak”. But what makes the tomahawk steak the giant of all steaks? Let’s cut into this epic beef dish, and uncover some of the mysteries behind the tomahawk steak. All about the Bone Although the named after the ax-like weapon because of it’s shape, the tomahawk steak is technically a regular ribeye steak that still has the bone. The long rib bone attached is what makes the handle of the Tomahawk steak. It is marbled, moist, and has an intense flavor thanks to its intact rib…

KhemaA Wine for the Devil’s Throat

“The ancient Egyptians believed the god Anubis met each of us on the other side, and that he stood before a great scale on which our hearts were set. There each was weighed, tested for its worth. Was this the heart I wanted measured? “ Victor LaValle Anubis Anubis was an important deity to the Egyptians, depicted as a canine or a man with a canine’s head: he was the god of death and all pertaining to it, mummification, embalming, the afterlife, cemeteries, tombs, and the underworld. Anubis was the protector of graves, the one who would guide your soul…

TopazTruffle Hog

“Whosoever says truffle, utters a grand word, which awakens erotic and gastronomic ideas” Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826), preface to ‘The Physiology of Taste’ (1825) Truffles, those incredible little culinary luxuries that almost defy description, one should never pass up an opportunity to smell, taste and commune with the plump little balls of ectomycorrhizal fungi found in the rhizosphere of oak and hazelnut trees. The merest sliver of a shaving of the hypogeous sporocarp, (fruiting body) of the truffle can transform even the blandest dish into something, exceptional, complex and completely irresistible. It is almost as if truffles are infused by magical…

KhemaThe Eternal Lunch

“The sweetness of food does not last long, but the sweetness of good words do.” Thai Proverb Whilst I lived in Thailand some time ago, I became very fond of a local saying taught to me by my Thai friends; I cherished it, mostly because I could observe it in action almost every day. The saying went something like this: ‘Thais eat five meals a day with snacks in between and when we are not eating, we are thinking about our next meal’, this often preceded the additional comment; ‘it’s only funny because it’s true!’ Few could blame them, Thai…
Back to top